The Essential Monroe Freedman, in Four Works

Capturing Monroe’s sixty years in the law, and the fifty years of our friendship, would be impossible. What does it truly mean to be a lawyer? Monroe addressed this question in so many contexts that no summary can do him justice. His is an integrated, considered body of work, based on human experience—his own and that of colleagues and clients. And, as you can see in everything he wrote, he also took vicarious account of injustices recorded in annals of the law and the lawless.
One cannot appreciate his contributions by reading a summary or bibliography, and I will not attempt to provide one. His work is not a series of episodes. Taken as a whole, it is a finely woven tapestry, in which we will continue to find new insight.

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