Tag Archives: Volume 37 Issue 4

Resolving the Conflict Between Jewish and Secular Estate Law

Fred and Judith are an observant Jewish couple. They have two children, David and Esther. The majority of their million dollars in assets, which comprise their life savings, are in Fred’s name, as is the interest they will use to … Continue reading

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Cracking Open the Golden Door: Revisiting U.S. Asylum Law’s Response to China’s One-Child Policy

The United States has a long and rich history of protecting those individuals fleeing persecution. The first immigrants came because of religious persecution; more later came because they were being persecuted for their political opinions. Congress even extended protection to … Continue reading

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What’s So Civil About Civil Commitment?: Balancing the State’s Interest in Treating Substance Dependence with the Protection of Individual Liberty Interests

In many ways, Natalie Ciappa’s senior year at a Long Island high school was like that of every other senior. She spent time with her brothers and with friends. She enjoyed watching horror movies with her family. She was a … Continue reading

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Cooperative Federalism and Wind: A New Framework for Achieving Sustainability

Since taking office in January 2009, President Barack Obama has made energy independence a national priority, calling upon Americans to “confront[] our dependence on foreign oil, address[] the moral, economic and environmental challenge of global climate change, and build[] a … Continue reading

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The Social Bases of Climate Change Knowledge, Concern, and Policy Support in the U.S. General Public

For the past two decades, the issue of climate change has been thoroughly politicized in the United States. By the early 1990s, the U.S environmental community—the environmental movement, sympathetic climate scientists, and environmental policy-makers—successfully defined anthropogenic (human-induced) global warming as … Continue reading

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Reciprocity and Environmental Obligations

Reciprocity—put most generally—is the idea of actions-in-return that are not founded in voluntary agreements or contracts. Understood in this way, reciprocity can be one-on-one: the return of a kindness or the exchange of presents. But it need not be: pitching … Continue reading

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The Ethical Responsibility to Reduce Energy Consumption

This Article argues that developed countries have an ethical responsibility to reduce energy consumption—through energy efficiency and conservation—as part of the global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While this responsibility is borne by nations themselves, it has consequences for … Continue reading

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Climate Change, Causation, and Delayed Harm

The causal linkage between human activity and climate change has been the locus for contentious debate over the past twenty years or so. It has been a proxy for larger debates over whether and how policymakers should respond to the … Continue reading

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Responsible Environmental Behavior, Energy Conservation, and Compact Fluorescent Bulbs: You Can Lead a Horse to Water But Can You Make It Drink?

Despite professing to care about the environment and supporting environmental causes, individuals behave in environmentally irresponsible ways like driving when they can take public transportation, littering, or disposing of toxic materials in unsound ways. This is my fourth exploration of … Continue reading

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Using Local Knowledge to Shrink the Individual Carbon Footprint

Entire texts have been devoted to exploring the meaning of the term “lifestyle” and sociological understandings of lifestyle are complex and nuanced. For present purposes, however, a more simple articulation of the term will suffice. Lifestyle can mean “mode of … Continue reading

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